Variations in English Prosody


-->
There are a few variations in English prosody. For the convenience of the readers I explain those briefly below:
  • Spondee: When both the syllables are accented, the foot is called spondee.
Ere ha'lf / my day's / in this / da'rk wo'rld / and wi'de
  • Pyrrhic: When both the syllables are unaccented, the foot is called pyrrhic.
Ere ha'lf / my day's / in this / da'rk wo'rld / and wi'de
  • Catalectic: If at the end of a trochaic line, there is only an accented syllable, it is presumed that an unaccented syllable has been dropped. In this case the foot is called catalectic.
A'll the / jo'ys that / ble'ss thee.
Swee't-er/ fa'r may/ be'.
  • Acephalous: If in the beginning of an iambic line, there is only one accented syllable, it is presumed that an unaccented syllable has been dropped. In this case the foot is called acephalous.
Ha'te/-ful i's/ the da'rk/ blue sky'.
  • Hypermetrical: If at the end of an iambic line, there is only an unaccented syllable, it is presumed that the syllable is extra. In this case the line is called extra-metrical or hypermetrical.
He a'te/ himse'lf / the ri'nd / and pa'r / -ing.

Popular posts from this blog

Analysis of Sir Philip Sidney’s Loving in Truth (Sonnet No. 1 from Astrophil and Stella)

Finding the answers in Charles Lamb's Dream Children: A Reverie